State Cannabis Regulations

  • Most states with legal recreational marijuana allow residents to self-grow several cannabis plants; the limit is typically around 6 plants per resident over 21 who can legally use cannabis products. Some states limit the number of mature plants to 2-3 or limit the number of plants per household (typically to 12 plants) despite the number of residents that can legally grow plants
    • Michigan allows residents over 21 to grow up to 12 plants
    • Oregon only allows residents over 21 to grow 4 plants in a residence
    • Vermont allows 2 mature and 7 immature plants
    • Illinois doesn't allow home-grow (but beginning January 1st 2020 Illinois will allow medical home-grow of up to 5 plants per household)
    • Washington doesn't allow recreational home-grow and places limits on medical home-grow
    • Nevada home-grow is only allowed if you reside more than 25 miles from a marijuana retailer
  • Limits on personal marijuana possession range in each state, but most states allow about 1oz of usable marijuana flower to be carried in Public and usually require that it is packaged or carried in a way that the marijuana isn't visible when carried on your person
    • limits for other products range a lot state by state, but typically those limits are in addition to the limits of cannabis flower (so you can legally have the 1oz of flower and the limit on concentrates on your person at the same time)
    • Illinois, Michigan, and Maine have the highest legal limit for marijuana possession at 2.5 oz of usable marijuana flower
  • Most states allow marijuana consumption only in private residences with a few exceptions
    • States with legal marijuana have difficulty placing a limit on blood THC concentration for safe driving, as “there is no per se level at which a person is presumed to be under the influence as a result of marijuana use,” according to a California Assembly Public Safety Committee analysis. This makes DUI laws for cannabis confusing for states with legal marijuana. Currently, the CHP and other law enforcement are attempting to do research to identify a way to address field sobriety when it comes to cannabis